Please forward this error screen to 208. Any discussion of the Top 100 ’90s Rock Albums will have to include some grunge, and this one is no different. That said, there’s far more to the story. 2018 Ultimate Classic Last Chance – John Mellencamp* – Whenever We Wanted is part of the Loudwire Network, Townsquare Media, Inc.

When Pete Seeger died on Jan. 27 at the age of 94, the world lost more than a folksinger, more than a songwriter, more than a moral leader who gave a soundtrack to social causes for three generations. We lost an artist who was uniquely American, the product of a musical tradition that was passed down by hand. Arlo Guthrie, a folk legend in his own right, spoke with TIME about his friend and music partner who inspired generations with his music and activism. TIME: Can you tell us about the first time you met Pete Seeger? Guthrie: I could if I could remember, but I was just a little kid, probably about 3 or 4 years old. This is when I actually met him.

My father had entered into the hospital part of his life in the mid 50s, which was about the same time I probably met Pete. The songs that they knew circulated by word of mouth, not by radio or by records or any electronic media. They were handed down from one person to another, from generation to generation. What was it like to play with him? Probably around 1968, when I was around 18, we did a concert together at Carnegie Hall. That is a tradition we continued, pretty much up until last November.

Every year for about 30 years Pete and I had a regularly scheduled show the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving. We took over that tradition about a decade ago without Pete, but every once in a while he said that he wanted to come and play. I remember watching how he handled the audience. I wouldn’t have used the words master in those days, but he had an authority over the audience that allowed them to relax and sing along with him. My eyes just opened up and I couldn’t believe what was happening in front of me. He would just wave his hand, and you could hear people singing.

He was well known for his banjo playing, but he also played the guitar very well. Did he have a favorite instrument? It was whatever allowed the accompaniment to sound in the way he wanted. He also was a wonderful player of the recorder. There were moments in the concerts we did where he would play some Native American tune or an Irish tune, and you could hear a pin drop in a crowd that would fill some of these larger venues.

You couldn’t hear a thing but this wafting air from that flute-like instrument, and it was just magic. In later years he began to have difficulty singing. Arlo, I can’t do those big shows with you anymore. I can’t sing like I used to sing. I can’t play like I used to play.

They can’t hear like they used to hear. How did Pete approach writing songs? He was the kind of songwriter who could remember a tune or a song that he’d heard somewhere in life, and he had a catalogue of hundreds of thousands of songs. I don’t know where the ones that he wrote came from, but I know that he had an awful lot to draw on that was part of his knowledge.