Gold Is King – Sol Invictus – Black Europe

Posted March 7th, 2018 by admin

Please forward this error screen to 64. Please forward this error screen to 167. Please forward this error screen to 167. The Three Magi, Gold Is King – Sol Invictus – Black Europe mosaic c.

As here Byzantine art usually depicts the Magi in Persian clothing which includes breeches, capes, and Phrygian caps. The Gospel of Matthew is the only one of the four canonical gospels that mentions the Magi. Matthew reports that they came “from the east” to worship the “king of the Jews”. In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, “Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage. Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared.

I may also go and pay him homage. The text specifies no interval between the birth and the visit, and artistic depictions and the closeness of the traditional dates of December 25 and January 6 encourage the popular assumption that the visit took place the same winter as the birth, but later traditions varied, with the visit taken as occurring up to two winters later. The wise men are mentioned twice shortly thereafter in verse 16, in reference to their avoidance of Herod after seeing Jesus, and what Herod had learned from their earlier meeting. The Magi are popularly referred to as wise men and kings. Although the Magi are commonly referred to as “kings,” there is nothing in the account from the Gospel of Matthew that implies that they were rulers of any kind. The New Testament does not give the names of the Magi. However, traditions and legends identify a variety of different names for them.

Encyclopædia Britannica states: “according to Western church tradition, Balthasar is often represented as a king of Arabia, Melchior as a king of Persia, and Gaspar as a king of India. In contrast, many Syrian Christians name the Magi Larvandad, Gushnasaph, and Hormisdas. In the Eastern churches, Ethiopian Christianity, for instance, has Hor, Karsudan, and Basanater, while the Armenian Catholics have Kagpha, Badadakharida and Badadilma. Matthew provides about the region from which they came. There is an Armenian tradition identifying the “Magi of Bethlehem” as Balthasar of Arabia, Melchior of Persia, and Gaspar of India.