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Sign up for our Today In Entertainment Newsletter. As Netflix Goes Global, Can It Avoid Regional Politics? Please forward this error screen to 72. Bon Temps, Louisiana, two years after the invention of a synthetic blood that has allowed vampires to “come out of the coffin” and allow their presence to be known to mankind. The show was broadcast on the premium cable network HBO, in the United States, and was produced by HBO in association with Ball’s production company, Your Face Goes Here Entertainment. The series premiered on September 7, 2008 and concluded on August 24, 2014, comprising seven seasons and 80 episodes.

Series creator Alan Ball had previously worked with the cable channel HBO on Six Feet Under, which ran for five seasons. In October 2005, after Six Feet Under wrapped, Ball signed a two-year agreement with HBO to develop and produce original programming for the network. The project’s hour-long pilot was ordered concurrently with the finalization of the aforementioned development deal, and was written, directed, and produced by Ball. The makers of the title sequence wanted to explore themes of redemption and forgiveness. The title sequence was created by the independent film company Digital Kitchen. A Venus fly-trap can be seen engulfing a frog, while a rotting fox’s head is sped up to reveal maggots feeding off the corpse.

Some of the footage used in the sequence was filmed on location. Digital Kitchen then took a four-day trip to Louisiana to film as well as shot at a Chicago church, and on a stage and in a bar in Seattle. In editing the opening, individual frames were splattered with drops of blood. Eight different typefaces, inspired by Southern road signs, were also created manually for cast and crew credits, as well as the show’s title card.

5 on a list of TV’s top 10 credits sequences, as selected by readers. Gary Calamar, who supervises the series’ music, said his goal for the show’s soundtrack is to create something “swampy, bluesy and spooky” and to feature local Louisiana musicians. True Blood soundtrack albums have twice earned Grammy Award nominations. Composer Nathan Barr writes the original score for the series, which features the cello, guitar, prepared piano, and glass harmonica among other instruments, all of which he performs himself. Atlantic Records released a True Blood soundtrack on May 19, 2009, the same day as the release of the DVD and Blu-ray of the first season.

Nathan Barr’s original score for True Blood was released on CD on the Varèse Sarabande label on September 8, 2009. Both Nathan Barr and Jace Everett won 2009 awards from Broadcast Music Incorporated in the BMI Cable Awards category for, respectively, True Blood’s original score and theme song. The show’s individual episode titles are named after songs featured in the episodes, usually heard during the closing credits. The title usually indicates something about the events that will unfold throughout the given episode. A prequel comic was handed out to attendees of the 2008 Comic-Con. HBO produced and broadcast two documentaries to promote True Blood, entitled “True Bloodlines”.

The first, Vampire Legends, explored the earliest portrayals of vampires in legend, literature, and cinema. The second, A New Type, discusses vampire culture from Nosferatu to today’s sensual, sexual creatures. To that end, the show also covered the modern vampire subculture and real-life vampire clubs. Thousands of DVDs of the first episode were handed out to attendees of Midnight Madness, a special film festival. Blockbuster Video provided free rental of the first episode of True Blood several days before it was broadcast on HBO. The video had a faint promotional watermark throughout the episode.